5 Takeaways From CNN’s Study on 13-Year-Olds

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CNN just aired a documentary on #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens. The show revealed findings of a study of more than 200 eighth graders and their use of social media. After reviewing more than 150,000 social media posts collected from the students’ social media sites, the study revealed these findings:

1. Teens are on smartphones and tablets constantly.

It’s not unusual for teens to check their devices more than 100 times a day. Whether at school, home, or at an afterschool activity, social media is a constant companion and source of instant access to the online lives of their friends and peers.

2. Social media is a source of anxiety for many teens.

Rather than being on social media to share good things that were going on in their lives, the majority of those in the study said they were checking their social media sites to make sure no one was saying bad things about them and to check their status. Were their posts getting “likes”? Are their friends doing things without them? Are people saying bad things about them?

3. Rather than posting, many teens are lurking.

About 1/3 of those in the study said they spend a large portion of their time studying their friends’ and peers’ social media sites to figure out where they stand in the social pecking order. They look to see who is in and who is out, whose popularity in growing and whose is waning. On the CNN show, many of the teens said one bad post or picture could ruin a person’s reputation.

4. Social media use can be addicting.

The parents and the 13-year-olds on the show all agreed the use of social media is addicting. Before taping the show, the parents were asked to take their children’s phones away. One girl was shown sobbing. A couple of them said they would rather go without food for a week or be grounded than to have their phones taken away.

5. Parents who pay attention to their teens’ online lives erase the negative effects of social media.

Ninety-four percent of parents in the study underestimated the impact that social media was having on their children’s well being. Those parents who were actively engaged in their teens’ online lives were able to help their teens navigate the pluses and minuses of their social media use. When teens knew their parents were monitoring what they were doing, they were far less likely to engage in bullying or sexting or other inappropriate behaviors that are all too common in the social media lives of 13-year-olds.

One other comment from the show stood out. For this generation, their face-to-face lives are the same as their social media lives. There is no distinction.

Beyond the negatives, the study found that teens use social media to show support for one another, to encourage peers when they were going through personal struggles, and to defend one another from people who were saying negative things about their friends.

Questions for Parents and Churches:

1. How are you helping the children and youth in your church engage in face-to-face conversations away from social media?

2. How are you paying attention to the impact of social media on your children or youth?

3. What alternatives to social media do you offer? When do you have children and youth take a break? When do children and youth do an activity without social media?

4.  As an adult, how many of these things are true for you as well? Do you lurk?  Are you constantly comparing your friend’s posting with your real life?  Are you checking your phone over 100 time a day?  Does too much consumption of social media make your anxious?

Craig Kennet Miller is the author of iKids: Parenting in the Digital Age. Go to www.iKidsgen.com for study guides for youth groups and parents.

The Release of Disney Infinity 3.0 Begins the Season of Star Wars Mania

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When Disney purchased Lucasfilm and the rights to the Star Wars franchise for $4 billion dollars in 2012, many assumed Disney would focus on reviving the Star Wars franchise by producing another round of movies. But this was only part of the plan. What Disney really wanted was the characters and the stories. For characters and stories have always put the magic in Disney.

Disney’s first cultural icon, Mickey Mouse, became the template upon which all future characters would be built. In 1928 he starred in Steamboat Willie, the first animated film to use synchronized music and sound effects. As the movie captured the imagination of popular culture, Walt Disney did what he did best — he teamed up with merchandisers to put Mickey Mouse in every house in America. Along with stuffed animals, Mickey appeared on pencils, in books, on children’s clothes, pillows, and sheets. Soon he had his own syndicated cartoon in the newspaper. But nothing said he had arrived better than the release of the iconic Mickey Mouse Watch, which sold over 11,000 units on its first day, a record for its time. But that was just the start. By the 1950s Mickey had his own television show, the Mickey Mouse Club, and a starting role in his own theme park, Disneyland, in California.

So when Disney purchased Star Wars, the production of movies was only one piece of the franchise pie. From now till the release of Star Wars VII The Force Awakens on December 18, 2015, a whole series of video games, animated TV shows, and books will be released to build momentum toward the opening of the movie.

Disney has even created a slogan and website called “Star Wars A Force For Change,” which promises to harness “the strength of Star Wars and its global fandom to empower people to come together to make a positive impact on the world around them.”

With the release of the video game Disney Infinity 3.0 Star Wars, Disney takes its popular toy-to-life video game to another level.  Included in the starter pack is the first of three Star Wars play sets that capture the breadth of the Star Wars story.  The starter pack comes with Twilight of the Republic, in which Anakin Skywalker and Ahsoka Tano battle during the latter years of the Clone Wars (episodes 1 – 3). The intergalactic adventure takes the characters to four planets, during which they battle droids as they try to save the republic from the separatists.

At the end of September the next play set, The Rise Against the Empire, will be released. Here gamers will be immersed in the original Star Wars movie universe (episodes  4-6) as they get to be Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia fighting against the Galactic Empire.  Then in December, in conjunction with the release of the newest movie, The Force Awakens play set will feature two new characters, Finn and Rey, that will allow gamers to play the in world of episode 7.

But this is only part of the story.  More than 100 playable characters will be included in the series, which at $14.99 a pop is quite an investment, along with the $64.99 starter pack and the $35.99 you pay for each additional play set.  Disney knows it will hard to resist the desire to play as Darth Vader, Yoda, Chewbacca, and Han Solo in a Star Wars experience that puts the gamer in the midst of the action.

Beyond the play sets, Disney Infinity also includes the groundbreaking Toy Box that allows gamers to create their own worlds using Star Wars images.  But more than that, in the Toy Box, Yoda can also hang out with Elsa from Frozen or Woody from Toy Story or Hulkbuster from Marvel’s universe of characters.

While it’s easy to see this as an attempt to separate parents from their hard-earned money, not to be lost is Disney’s profound understanding of the appeal of Star Wars to grandparents, parents, and children alike.  For Stars Wars is not only an intergalactic adventure, it also is an intergenerational cultural experience that started in 1977.

People in their fifties and sixties can easily remember their first experience of the release of episodes 4 – 6, when “let the force be with you” became part of the cultural lexicon of the late 1970s and early 1980s.  Those in their thirties and forties became immersed in the story in the 1980s and 1990s with the advent of Video Tapes and DVDs that allowed them as kids to watch the movies over and over again in their home theaters.  In 1999, the series got new life with the release of episodes 1 – 3, which introduced the series to a whole new generation.  Now with Disney Infinity 3.0, the grandchildren and children of Star Wars fans have the opportunity to be caught up in the story in a totally new way.  Not only will they be able to watch the movies, toy-to-life video gaming allows them to become the characters as they interact in the Star Wars universe.

With the release of Disney Infinity 3.0, Disney has redefined the Star Wars experience.  Rather than buying a particular game, it becomes its own game system, which can be played on any gaming platform from the Wii U to the PS4, from the Xbox One to the PC.  If you have a grandchild or child, don’t be surprised if you find yourself investing in Disney Infinity 3.0, because deep down, you know if you have it, you’ll get to play it too.

Questions for church leaders:

  • How do Bible stories and characters become an intergenerational experience?
  • How will you handle the cultural phenomenon of all things Star Wars that will reach its zenith right before Christmas?
  • Will you ignore it?  Reference it in your preaching? Create a study?

 

Jurassic World Is Not About the Dinosaurs

With the release of the new movie, Jurassic World this week, I decided to read the original book by Michael Crichton which he wrote in 1990. As I got into the story I realized the book’s real focus was not dinosaurs. Instead, it is a riveting critique of the idea that science has the final authority on truth.

Crichton, who died in 2008, was a prolific writer who wrote a series of books that expressed an ongoing theme, he believed scientists had become more concerned about profits than discoveries that furthered the health and welfare of humanity.

In Jurassic Park, Crichton’s voice is heard in the words of Ian Malcom, a maverick mathematical genius. He was hired as a consultant to advise John Hammond, the rich entrepreneur who wanted to advance the field of genetic engineering, no matter the cost. Rather than be burdened by government red tape, he bought an island where he was free to do what ever he wanted in the name of science. His goal was to create a controlled environment where he could show the world the amazing things that could be done, even bringing dinosaurs back to life.

Throughout the book Malcom utters a series of remarks that skews the notion that scientists can control their creations. Malcom (i.e. Crichton) makes the case that the idea the physical universe follows a predictable, observable pattern has been overturned by mathematical discoveries like chaos theory and fractals. He also believed you can’t control nature. Living things will do anything to survive. Here are two quotes that sums up the theme that runs through the book:

“You decide you’ll control nature, and from that moment on you’re in deep trouble, because you can’t do it…Don’t confuse things. You can make a boat, but you can’t make an ocean. You can make an airplane, but you can’t make the air. Your powers are much less than your dreams of reason would have you believe.”                                                                                           (p. 351, Jurassic Park, paperback, 1990).

“My point is that life on earth can take care of itself. In the thinking of a human being, a hundred years is a long time. A hundred years ago, we didn’t have cars and airplanes and computers and vaccines…it was a whole different world. But to the earth, a hundred years is nothing. A million years is nothing…Let’s be clear. The planet is not in jeopardy. We are in jeopardy. We haven’t got the power to destroy the planet – or to save it. But we might have the power to save ourselves.”
(p. 369 Jurassic Park, paperback, 1990)

So if you happen to go to the theater this week to watch dinosaurs break free of their constraints and eat some humans, be well advised that Crichton’s ideas have far larger implications. For him the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park are a metaphor for how science without ethics and boundaries has the potential to unleash environmental catastrophes that in the long run won’t bother the planet one iota. The real problem is not what we are doing to the planet. Its what we are doing to ourselves.

If you take your iKid (the generation born since 2000) to the movie, here are a couple of questions for reflection:

  1. Why did the scientists create the dinosaurs?
  2. What scientific advances do you think are creating a better future?
  3. Which ones do you think are dangerous?
  4. Do you think we should use genetics to create new creatures? (Like combining the DNA of a monkey and a jelly fish so the monkey glows in the dark)
  5. How do we decide which discoveries are good and which ones are bad?

Craig Kennet Miller is the author of iKids: Parenting in the Digital Age

When Trying to Win it All Fails the iKids: The Little League Fiasco

Tim Corbin, the coach of the Vanderbilt Baseball team, whose team won the college world series last year, made a very interesting comment in an interview he did on 104.5 The Zone. When asked why a high school baseball player should choose to go to college rather than to sign a professional contract and play in the minor leagues, he replied “in college kids can make mistakes, grow from them, and learn from them.”   He went on to add that once you enter professional baseball, if you have a bad year, your career could be over quickly. In college you have a second chance.

Corbin’s comments are worth considering when we look at the world of iKids sports. Today, it was announced that because of cheating, the Chicago Jackie Robinson West Little League Team  has to give up its 2014 national title. It seems the leaders of the league expanded their boundaries to allow them to include more top tier ten, eleven, and twelve year-olds on the team from neighboring leagues.

The real losers in this story are the little leaguers who have now lost their innocence and their pride because of the scheme hatched by the adult leaders of the league to increase their chances at winning. So who’s to blame for this fiasco? Let’s zero on three contributors to this situation.

  • First, goes to ESPN who broadcasts the series and produces a show that at once celebrates the accomplishments of preteens but also exposes them to fame and ridicule in the national spotlight. Rather than playing for fun, today’s little leagues are more focused on making it to the big ball game and developing elite players.
  • Second, goes to the increase of the professionalization of youth sports. Carol Mithers, in an article on “Are Kids’ Sports Too Competitive?’ reports that 30 to 45 million iKids participate in sports each year. As organized sports leagues have become big business she says, youth sports “has changed in troubling ways. Not only are players joining competitive leagues at very young ages, more and more of them are choosing to specialize, focus, and train intensively in only one sport.”
  • Third, goes to parents whom in their desire to help their children succeed, pressure their children to become the next stars. And its not just the parents, throw in coaches who are eager to prove themselves on the ball field and you have an unhealthy pressure to succeed at all costs.

As registration starts for spring sports parents around the country will be signing up their children for baseball, softball, and soccer.   Millions of iKids will hit the fields with youthful enthusiasm and a heartfelt desire to make their parents proud. Its up to the parents, the coaches, and the organizers of these experiences to focus on what is most important, the physical, mental, and spiritual development of the iKids that are under their care.

While winning is an objective that all would like to achieve, learning how to play the game, staying within the bounds of rules, and sportsmanship is something everyone needs to learn. More importantly, Corbin gives us a template to emulate, creating an atmosphere where its okay to make mistakes because those around you – your teammates, your coaches, and your parents are there to pick you up so you can try it again.

iKids on Flipboard’s New Website

Today Flipboard has launched a new website that allows you to collect and keep track of your favorite topics on the web. Developed first for the iPad and later for smartphones, Flipboard is a great app for keeping track of the ideas that are most important for to you and your work.

I have used it to create some of my own magazines where I have been collecting articles around topics that are of importance to me. If you haven’t tried it, I invite you to take a look.   If you are new to Flipboard, when you find a magazine you like, click on “follow” and it will be added to your collection of sites.  You also can add Flipboard to your tablet and/or smartphone.

Here are three Flipboard Magazines I have developed.  I invite you to try these out and create your own collection of ideas that matter to you.

iKids
http://flip.it/vvxXM
Learn about the digital life of children and teens, those born from 2000 – 2017
With over 1,500 articles, you will find articles on gaming, digital technology, brain development, health, and spirituality.

Innovative Leadership Project
http://flip.it/TFjno
Creating innovative leaders at the heart of local churches – churchleaderUMC.com
With a focus on work and productivity, this collection of articles delves into issues of work/balance, creating healthy habits, organization, running meetings, and tips for being a creative leader.

Millennials Trending
http://flip.it/Wqrxi
Urban Life and the Spirituality of Young Adults
My newest collection looks at the newest research on young adulthood, especially as it relates to Second Generation Americans, social media, education, and financial issues related to this generation.

The Legend of Zelda Symphony, a Spiritual Experience

Little did I know when I bought tickets to Zelda for my son for Christmas, that we would be at the world premier of The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses – Master Quest. When we walked into the Schermerhorn Concert Hall where the Nashville Symphony plays, I realized this was a different experience. First, there was a giant LCD Monitor hanging in the concert hall with images on the screen from the popular Zelda video game series created by Nintendo. Second, this was not your usual symphony crowd. It was made up of twenty-somethings and teenagers.  Many were wearing Zelda costumes. Third, the orchestra was not in tuxes, but dressed in black with open collars.

And then the concert started. As images from the Zelda video game series flashed on the screen the orchestra provided the live background music that greatly enhanced the experience. On top of that the Nashville Symphony Chorus added to the mix when they vocalized sounds that created a tapestry of moods from anger to love, from war to peace.

If the goal of Jason Michael Paul, the producer of the event was to capture the imagination, he was quite successful. My son and his fellow concertgoers were on the edges of their seats as scenarios from the 30-year history of the Zelda series unfolded through sight and sound. When we think of video games, we tend to focus on the visual elements, the puzzles that need to be solved, and the quests that need to be completed. What this concert brought to the forefront was the essential role music plays to create the atmosphere of the game.

This was most clearly seen in The Symphony: Movement IV – Time of the Falling Rain. The music was from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, a game released in 1992. The graphics were what you expect from a game created in the early nineties, nothing compared to the images we see in today’s games. But as the music played, it didn’t matter. On the original game the music is rendered on a synthesizer with limited musical intonation. But when played by a full orchestra with the accompanying voices of the chorus, it became an immersive experience that pulled you into the heroic efforts of Link to rescue Zelda who is imprisoned in Hyrule Castle. As Link moves between the Light World to the Dark World, the music matched its intensity. And when Link finally conquers his foes, he touches the Triforce to restore the world to what it was before evil tried to destroy it.

As I left the concert hall I was impressed by the quality of the event and how meshing the new with the old, the video game with the symphony, created a spiritual experience that captured the story that is as old as time. The hero who conquers evil in the name of good. The spiritual power that gives guidance and hope in the midst of adversity. The desire to be part of something that is bigger than oneself.

As we were riding home from the concert I could hear a lot of pinging sounds in the backseat. I asked my son what was going on. He had taken his Nintendo DS Game system with him and left it on during the concert. Silently it had connected with over 100 other gamers who had attended with their devices. He was capturing their avatars and replying to them.   In many ways he was taking the experience home with him and I was briefly connected with a world much different from my own, a world full of experience, meaning, and connection that goes beyond our physical limitations.

iKids Presentations Ready to View

Six 30-minute presentations on iKids: Parenting in the Digital Age are now available for your viewing.  Each prerecorded webinar takes you through a series of slides and images that will allow you to go deeper into the iKids material as you think about the implications of digital technology in the lives of those born since 2000.

Led by Craig Kennet Miller, the author of iKids, the presentations are based on the iKids book and the Six Values for the Digital Age PDF, a free downloadable study guide designed for use with small groups, Sunday School classes, and group meetings.

Go to https://ikidsgen.com/ikids-webinars/ 

Or click on the “iKids Presentations” Tab at the top of this page to access the material.