The Diverse iKids of CA

 A significant change is taking place in California that signals a remarkable shift in its population. In times past, California’s population growth came from outside the state. After WWII, huge numbers of people drove west on Highway 66 from Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, and other mid-western states to move to the golden state. “California here I come”, was a popular line for a song extolling the benefits of its weather, jobs, and an opportunity to reinvent yourself.

Starting in the 1980s a new wave of people arrived from outside the state, this time from countries like Mexico, China, the Philippines, Tonga, and El Salvador. These first generation immigrants brought with them their rich cultures, foods, traditions, and languages that have transformed California into a creative tapestry that makes it a hub of innovation, diversity, and change.

But since 2000, the inflow of new residents has plateaued. This is most clearly seen in the population of its youngest generation. Since 2000 of 90% of the iKids Generation, those born since 2000, were born in California. Dowell Myers, in a USC Price report on “California’s Diminishing Resource: Children,” says, “Almost all CA children are born and raised in the state, unlike in past decades when many migrated from other states or nations. As these children grow into adulthood, they are beginning to remake the state. The historic transition to a “homegrown” majority is so recent, that its significance is not yet appreciated.”

While over 29% of California iKids have a least one parent who was born outside the United States, over 90% of them are Second Generation Americans. When looking at ethnicity some surprising information emerges. 91% of Whites, 94% of Blacks, 95% of Latinos, and 85% of Asians and Pacific Islanders iKids were born in California.

What does this mean for the future?

  1. In the past California’s growth was based on the inflow of new people from outside the state. Now is growth will be determined by the success of its own homegrown children. Economic success in the future will be based on how well California educates, trains, and equips its own children.
  2. While 52% are of Latino descent and 11% are of Asian descent, these Second Generation Americans see the world much differently from their parent’s generation. Churches, businesses, and educational institutions should realize the young Latinos and Asians of California are different than their parents. For most of them their primary language is English, they resonate with the American popular culture, and they share an American worldview.
  3. Because there are less people coming from outside the state, the percentage of children to the overall population is going down. This will be most clearly seen in the coming decades as the older adult population will skyrocket. In 2010 there were 22 senior adults per 100 people age 25 to 64. By 2050, when this generation will be in their prime earning years, there will be 46 older adults over 65 per 100 people who are 25 to 64.

Another study from the Pop Dynamics Research Group at the University of Southern California focused on the importance of developing intentional strategies for Second Generation Americans as they enter what they call the “Training Age” from age 18 to 24. This is when young adults go to college, trade schools, and have their first experience of work. From 2010 to 2030, 98% of the job growth in California will be attributed to Second Generation Americans. The study says, “This underscores how vital the second generation will be both as a source of labor forces and as the major source for replenishing the work force that would otherwise be depleted through increasing numbers of retirements.”

One of the primary places this information impacts is on California’s churches whose primary strategy over the years has been to reach newcomers to the state.  In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s the focus was on welcoming people from other states who carried with them mid-western worldviews and  were primarily white and black.  In the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, the focus was on reaching new immigrant populations by offering ministries in their native languages and who reflected the cultural heritage of the country from where they came.

Today’s generation of young people under the age of 30 in California are Second Generation, homegrown residents. They are the ones who are finding it difficult to find a place in California’s overcrowded colleges, who carry with them huge student dept, and will find it difficult to find housing in an expensive and competitive real estate market.  The future of the church will depend on its ability to connect with its homegrown population.  To reach this generation churches will need to pivot their approach to focus on the cultural norms and expectations of a diverse young adult and youth population whose main identity is Californian.  Not the California of the past, but a new California whose values and worldview is being re-imaged by a Second Generation whose cultural diversity defines them.

The Legend of Zelda Symphony, a Spiritual Experience

Little did I know when I bought tickets to Zelda for my son for Christmas, that we would be at the world premier of The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses – Master Quest. When we walked into the Schermerhorn Concert Hall where the Nashville Symphony plays, I realized this was a different experience. First, there was a giant LCD Monitor hanging in the concert hall with images on the screen from the popular Zelda video game series created by Nintendo. Second, this was not your usual symphony crowd. It was made up of twenty-somethings and teenagers.  Many were wearing Zelda costumes. Third, the orchestra was not in tuxes, but dressed in black with open collars.

And then the concert started. As images from the Zelda video game series flashed on the screen the orchestra provided the live background music that greatly enhanced the experience. On top of that the Nashville Symphony Chorus added to the mix when they vocalized sounds that created a tapestry of moods from anger to love, from war to peace.

If the goal of Jason Michael Paul, the producer of the event was to capture the imagination, he was quite successful. My son and his fellow concertgoers were on the edges of their seats as scenarios from the 30-year history of the Zelda series unfolded through sight and sound. When we think of video games, we tend to focus on the visual elements, the puzzles that need to be solved, and the quests that need to be completed. What this concert brought to the forefront was the essential role music plays to create the atmosphere of the game.

This was most clearly seen in The Symphony: Movement IV – Time of the Falling Rain. The music was from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, a game released in 1992. The graphics were what you expect from a game created in the early nineties, nothing compared to the images we see in today’s games. But as the music played, it didn’t matter. On the original game the music is rendered on a synthesizer with limited musical intonation. But when played by a full orchestra with the accompanying voices of the chorus, it became an immersive experience that pulled you into the heroic efforts of Link to rescue Zelda who is imprisoned in Hyrule Castle. As Link moves between the Light World to the Dark World, the music matched its intensity. And when Link finally conquers his foes, he touches the Triforce to restore the world to what it was before evil tried to destroy it.

As I left the concert hall I was impressed by the quality of the event and how meshing the new with the old, the video game with the symphony, created a spiritual experience that captured the story that is as old as time. The hero who conquers evil in the name of good. The spiritual power that gives guidance and hope in the midst of adversity. The desire to be part of something that is bigger than oneself.

As we were riding home from the concert I could hear a lot of pinging sounds in the backseat. I asked my son what was going on. He had taken his Nintendo DS Game system with him and left it on during the concert. Silently it had connected with over 100 other gamers who had attended with their devices. He was capturing their avatars and replying to them.   In many ways he was taking the experience home with him and I was briefly connected with a world much different from my own, a world full of experience, meaning, and connection that goes beyond our physical limitations.

iKids Presentations Ready to View

Six 30-minute presentations on iKids: Parenting in the Digital Age are now available for your viewing.  Each prerecorded webinar takes you through a series of slides and images that will allow you to go deeper into the iKids material as you think about the implications of digital technology in the lives of those born since 2000.

Led by Craig Kennet Miller, the author of iKids, the presentations are based on the iKids book and the Six Values for the Digital Age PDF, a free downloadable study guide designed for use with small groups, Sunday School classes, and group meetings.

Go to https://ikidsgen.com/ikids-webinars/ 

Or click on the “iKids Presentations” Tab at the top of this page to access the material.

iKids Group Study Update

An updated version Six Values for the Digital Age: A Group Study based on iKids: Parenting in the Digital Age is now available.  Its been great getting feedback from those who have used it and those who are planning to use it in a variety of ways.  Some will be doing a series on Wednesday evenings, others are using it as a blueprint for a sermon series, and some are using it with small groups and Sunday School classes with parents.

What is Six Values? It is a free PDF download designed for use by parents and adults in church small groups and Sunday School classes who want to discuss the ideas found in iKids: Parenting in the Digital Age. The study is sure to produce lively discussions about the use of techgear (smartphones and tablets), how digital media influences family life, and how to balance the spiritual and digital lives of iKids in our homes and congregations.  It includes highlights from the iKids book and biblical passages for reflection.

Go to https://ikidsgen.com/small-group-studyteaching-helps/ or click on the iKids Study/Download tab and scroll down to Six Values for the Digital Age to download the PDF.